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The Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) training courses describe the principles and the approaches needed to ensure representative, reproducible, and defensible data during soil sampling. ISM involves planning, sample collection, and laboratory processing and analysis to provide a representative sample with results that more accurately reflect the mean concentration of the area of interest than discrete samples. The ISM training courses provide you the key principles regarding sampling and sampling error and how ISM reduces those errors so that you can have more confidence in your sampling results.

Soil Sampling and Decision Making Using Incremental Sampling Methodology - Part 1

When sampling soil at potentially contaminated sites, the goal is collecting representative samples which will lead to quality decisions. Unfortunately traditional soil sampling methods do not always provide accurate, reproducible, and defensible data. Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) can help with this soil sampling challenge. ISM is a structured composite sampling and processing protocol that reduces data variability and provides a reasonable estimate of a chemical's mean concentration for the volume of soil being sampled. The three key components of ISM are systematic planning, field sample collection, and laboratory processing and analysis. The adequacy of ISM sample support (sample mass) reduces sampling and laboratory errors, and the ISM strategy improves the reliability and defensibility of sampling data by reducing data variability.

ISM provides representative samples of specific soil volumes defined as Decision Units. An ISM replicate sample is established by collecting numerous increments of soil (typically 30 to 100 increments) that are combined, processed, and subsampled according to specific protocols. ISM is increasingly being used for sampling soils at hazardous waste sites and on suspected contaminated lands. Proponents have found that the coverage afforded by collecting many increments, together with disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, yields consistent and reproducible results that in most instances have been preferable to the results obtained by more traditional (e.g., discrete) sampling approaches.

This 2-part training course along with ITRC's web-based Incremental Sampling Methodology Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document (ISM-1, 2012) is intended to instruct regulators and practitioners on the fundamental concepts of soil/contaminant heterogeneity, representative sampling, sampling/laboratory error, and how ISM addresses these concepts. Through this training course you should learn:

In addition, this ISM training and guidance provides insight on when and how to apply ISM at a contaminated site, and it will aid in developing or reviewing project documents incorporating ISM (e.g., work plans, sampling plans, reports). You will also be provided with links to additional resources related to ISM.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are state and federal regulators, project managers, and consultant personnel responsible for and/or directly involved in developing, identifying, or applying soil and sediment sampling approaches and establishing sampling objectives and methods.

Recommended Reading: We encourage participants to review the ITRC ISM document, http://www.itrcweb.org/ISM-1/, prior to participating in the training classes.  If your time is limited for reviewing the complete document in advance, we suggest, at a minimum, reading the Executive Summary, Chapter 4 - “Statistical Sampling Designs for ISM,” and Chapter 7 - “Making Decisions Using ISM Data” to maximize your learning experience during the training classes.

Course Dates

Soil Sampling and Decision Making Using Incremental Sampling Methodology - Part 2

When sampling soil at potentially contaminated sites, the goal is collecting representative samples which will lead to quality decisions. Unfortunately traditional soil sampling methods do not always provide accurate, reproducible, and defensible data. Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) can help with this soil sampling challenge. ISM is a structured composite sampling and processing protocol that reduces data variability and provides a reasonable estimate of a chemical's mean concentration for the volume of soil being sampled. The three key components of ISM are systematic planning, field sample collection, and laboratory processing and analysis. The adequacy of ISM sample support (sample mass) reduces sampling and laboratory errors, and the ISM strategy improves the reliability and defensibility of sampling data by reducing data variability.

ISM provides representative samples of specific soil volumes defined as Decision Units. An ISM replicate sample is established by collecting numerous increments of soil (typically 30 to 100 increments) that are combined, processed, and subsampled according to specific protocols. ISM is increasingly being used for sampling soils at hazardous waste sites and on suspected contaminated lands. Proponents have found that the coverage afforded by collecting many increments, together with disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, yields consistent and reproducible results that in most instances have been preferable to the results obtained by more traditional (e.g., discrete) sampling approaches.

This 2-part training course along with ITRC's web-based Incremental Sampling Methodology Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document (ISM-1, 2012) is intended to instruct regulators and practitioners on the fundamental concepts of soil/contaminant heterogeneity, representative sampling, sampling/laboratory error, and how ISM addresses these concepts. Through this training course you should learn:

In addition, this ISM training and guidance provides insight on when and how to apply ISM at a contaminated site, and it will aid in developing or reviewing project documents incorporating ISM (e.g., work plans, sampling plans, reports). You will also be provided with links to additional resources related to ISM.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are state and federal regulators, project managers, and consultant personnel responsible for and/or directly involved in developing, identifying, or applying soil and sediment sampling approaches and establishing sampling objectives and methods.

Recommended Reading: We encourage participants to review the ITRC ISM document, http://www.itrcweb.org/ISM-1/, prior to participating in the training classes.  If your time is limited for reviewing the complete document in advance, we suggest, at a minimum, reading the Executive Summary, Chapter 4 - “Statistical Sampling Designs for ISM,” and Chapter 7 - “Making Decisions Using ISM Data” to maximize your learning experience during the training classes.

Course Dates

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